– Queen Anne’s Lace

Queen Anne’s Lace seeds’ have been used traditionally as a natural morning after pill, and birth control pill substitute for hundreds of years. The seeds’ antifertility effects were recorded in a New York City study on 13 women from March 1992 to February 1993. The study was conducted by Robin Bennett, a woman with eight years of experience harvesting and using Queen Anne’s lace seeds for contraception. The study showed a 98% success rate in contraceptive action.

Queen’s Anne Lace

Queen Anne’s Lace works by causing the uterine environment to be inhospitable to a pregnancy, and ultimately inhibiting implantation of a fertilized ovum. Keep in mind that you must use an accurate field guide when gathering Queen Anne’s lace; there are poisonous look-alikes in the carrot family and must be avoided. Queen Anne’s laces’ mature seeds can be gathered during the fall. If purchasing seeds, purchase only organic to avoid ones treated with chemicals.

WARNING LEVEL: Low Risk Associated with Use

LAST MENSTRUAL CYCLE: If Your Last Menstrual Cycle Started About 4 Weeks Ago

POSSIBLY TOXIC: Kidney and/or Liver Toxin

UTERINE AND HORMONAL EFFECTS: Inhibits Implantation, Increases Estrogen, Reduces Progesterone

ALSO KNOWN AS: queen anne’s lace, wild carrot, bird’s nest, lace flower, devil’s plague, parsnip, rantipole

IS USED FOR: a variety of uses

HOW IT’S PREPARED:

  • Implantation Inhibiting Queen Anne’s Lace Seed: Stir 1 tsp. (3 g) Queen Anne’s lace seeds into a glass of water and drink the day after unprotected sex to inhibit implantation. OR One teaspoon (3 g) can also be chewed daily during ovulation or for up to one week to inhibit implantation.
  • Tincture (dried seeds): 1:5, 60% alcohol, 20 – 60 drops of tincture are taken once or twice the day after unprotected sex to inhibit implantation.

POSSIBLE SIDE-EFFECTS AND SIGNS OF TOXICITY: no known signs of toxicity

RESOURCES & REFERENCES: