– Tarragon

Tarragon

With fresh leaves smelling of licorice, tarragon, a herb native to Europe, is used to flavor many dishes in French cuisine.

Tarragon roots are traditionally used topically to treat toothaches or animal bites. Brewed as a tea it can be used to treat digestive problems, to stimulate the appetite, as a diuretic, and to promote the onset of menstruation (an emmenagogue).

ALSO KNOWN AS:
Artemis or Artemisia Dracunculus

WARNING LEVEL: Moderate Risk Associated with Use

LAST MENSTRUAL CYCLE: Time Frame Unknown

POSSIBLY TOXIC: Contains Thujone

UTERINE AND HORMONAL EFFECTS: not known

ALSO KNOWN AS: not applicable

IS USED FOR: It has been used in cooking for flavor since it tastes like licorice.  Medicinally it is an anticoagulant and thins the blood helping to reduce the risk of blood clots including heart attacks and strokes.

HOW IT’S PREPARED:

  • Tea: 1/2 teaspoon of dried herb in half a cup (120ml, 4 fl oz) of water and allow to brew for at least 10 minutes, before straining. Use unsweetened at a dosage of up to a cup a day.
  • Food/Spice: Add to your cooking
  • NOTE: There is a similar herb, for which seeds are often sold with the name “Tarragon”, but these are almost always the Russian Tarragon, which is a different plant entirely.

POSSIBLE SIDE-EFFECTS AND SIGNS OF TOXICITY: May cause excessive bleeding due to its anticoagulant properties, do not take with other anticoagulants or blood thinners. Tarragon essential oil is mildly toxic and may be a carcinogen.

RESOURCES & REFERENCES: